suquamish museum

suquamish museum
suquamish museum
suquamish museum
 

Current and Upcoming Exhibits in the rotating Gallery

 

Trade of the Northwest Coast  Sep 18-Jun 11, 2017

 

Elwah: A River Reborn  Jun 18-Sep 4, 2017

 

People of the Clear Salt Water  Sep 16-Feb 11, 2018

 

 

Trade of the Northwest Coast

September 18 to June 11

 

The JayHawk Institute's Duane and Betty Pasco present Trade of the Northwest Coast in partnership with the Suquamish Museum.  The exhibit explores trade by Native American Tribes along the Northwest Coast over thousands of years, as well as, the unique "trade language," Chinook, that enabled communication along the trade routes.

 

Many rare and unique items made by Duane and Betty Pasco or loaned from their collections are featured. A canoe with a woven cedar bark sail occupies the center of the exhibit and illustrates the primary mode of travel.  Carved by Duane Pasco, the canoe contains mats, bent-wood boxes and other items used for long distance travel.  Adjacent to the canoe are canoe designs and paddle styles.  The full size cedar bark sail was woven in 2014, in a project lead by Betty Pasco.  The canoe with sail set out on an inaugural voyage in August 2015, the first time in over 150 years with a traditional cedar woven sail.

 

Trade of the Northwest Coast explores relationships between Tribes and with Fur Traders who arrived in the region in the 1820s.  First contact journals and Tribal oral history accounts chronicle the interactions of the first decades as both groups sought advantages from the new introduction of goods and services.  The goods and services are also discussed alongside how both Tribes and Europeans assigned monetary value to their exchange.

 

The JayHawk Institute was founded out of the desires of noted Pacific Nortwest Native Style artist Duane Pasco and his wife, Betty, a Suquamish Tribal Elder and weaver/artist/teacher to pass on their considerable knowledge of, and passion for, Pacific Northwest traditions and culture.  www.JayHawkInstitute.org 

 

 

 

 

ʔəsgəlk̓alikʷ

Woven: Contemporary Salish Wool Weavings by Danielle Morsette

2016

 

The Year of Salish Wool Weaving at the Suquamish Museum begins with an exhibit proposed by Weaver Danielle Morsette in 2014.  Inspired by a Bill and Fran James (Lummi) Blanket she saw as a youth on display at the Suquamish Museum, Morsette learned traditional Coast Salish weaving from Virginia Adams (Suquamish), Marjorie Lawrence (Tulalip), Marcie Baker (Squamish) and others.  The Coast Salish tradition, passed down through the generations, uses a loom and tools unchanged in design over many centuries.  Learning how to weave remains similar too.  The patterns taught through a hands-on mentor relationship begin with a simple over and under style and then progress through learning twill and twine techniques.  Morsette, who began weaving a little over a decade ago, produces unique designs incorporating the many possible pattern variations.

 

Designed to introduce the viewer to Coast Salish Wool Weaving, Woven presents individual small woven panels of each style.  Together they comprise both a journey through time, as design elements changed, and the journey of a student who learns each technique. Alongside the illustrative panels, unique contemporary designed blankets, skirts, shawls, and more by Morsette also demonstrate how a weaver then translates knowledge of traditional styles into their work.  Her loom with a work in progress will also be on display to allow the viewer an intimate view of the process in action.

 

Danielle Morsette (Suquamish) completed her first major commission blanket in 2010.  Since then she has exhibited pieces at the Suquamish Museum (2011), the Burke Museum (2013) and at the O’Brian Gallery (University of British Columbia Museum of Anthropology) (2014).  She has also received prominent scholarships to pursue her weaving from the YVR Art Foundation (2012) and the Potlatch Foundation (2015).

 

 

45-KP-2: The Archaeology of Old Man House

2015

 

Curated by Suquamish Museum Archivist/Curator, Lydia Sigo, 45-KP-2: The Archaeology of Old Man House, features artifacts excavated by the University of Washington archaeologist Warren Snyder, in 1950 and 1951.  The collection returned last October to the Suquamish Tribe from the Burke Museum where it had been on deposit since the excavations. Large format photographs and graphics illustrate the archaeological excavations and information gleaned from the subsequent research about the site.

 

Suquamish Tribal Chairman, Leonard Forsman, and Suquamish Tribal Historic Preservation Officer, Dennis Lewarch, assisted Ms. Sigo with the research for the exhibit.  Also on view, in the Lawerence Webster Education Auditorium, is a film by local producer, Matthew St. Carrell, who worked with Ms. Sigo to produce an accompanying video presentation: Ancestors Return: The Legacy of Old Man House.

 

The site, occupied for thousands of years by the Suquamish People, is best known today for Old Man House, a traditional Salish design shed roof dwelling.  Once home to Chiefs Sealth and Kitsap, both hereditary leaders of the Suquamish Tribe, the dwelling is believed to date from the later part of the Eighteenth-century, reaching its peak by the mid Nineteenth-century during the lifetime of Chief Sealth.

 

Today the site on the shore of Agate Pass is a housing subdivision with a portion of the traditional Old Man House beach preserved within the boudaries of the Suquamish Old Man House Park.  The structure itself was burned in the 1870s by the U.S. government to encourage Suquamish Tribal members who still lived on the site to remove to individual allotments assigned to families on the Port Madison Indian Reservation.   The Park site, purchased by the State of Washington in 1950 to perserve a portion of the original Old Man House Village Site, was returned to the Suquamish Tribe by the Washington State Parks and Recreation department in 2004.

 

 

100 Years: Photographs from the Suquamish Tribal Archives

2015

 

A Suquamish Museum Traveling exhibit comes home.  First exhibited in the 1990s, 40 images of Suquamish People from the last century will challenge your romanticized notion of the American Indian.  All of the photographs are part of the Museum's Archives and can be special ordered through our Research Room.

 

 

Salish Bounty: Traditional Native American Foods of Puget Sound

2014

Created in close partnership with the Native Coast Salish advisors, Salish Bounty: Traditional Native American Foods of Puget Sound explores the deep history of the area's food traditions. Coast Salish diets are incredibly diverse—and always have been. Archaeological sites around Puget Sound have revealed more than 280 plant and animal species used as food, and knowledge from elders has added even more to this list.

Salish Bounty—comprised of historic photo images, map, and informative text printed on free-standing banners―reminds us that food isn't solitary; cooking and eating are things we do with other people and express our cultural history and values. The exhibit also includes a 4-minute audiovisual DVD offering archaeological insight to Coast Salish food resources spanning thousands of years along the Duwamish River.

Like other food traditions around the world, the revival of Coast Salish food embodies the reestablishment of more healthful and sustainable practices that honor land and community. For a local flare, host institutions are encouraged to display theme related objects from their own collections or directly from their area tribal communities. 

Salish Bounty: Traditional Native American Foods of Puget Sound has been organized by the Burke Museum, University of Washington, with co-curators Warren King George (Muckleshoot/Upper Skagit Indian Tribe) and Elizabeth Swanaset (Nooksack/Cowichan/Laq'amel Tribes).

 

45-KP-2: The Archaeology of Old Man House

 2014

 

Curated by Suquamish Museum Archivist/Curator, Lydia Sigo, 45-KP-2: The Archaeology of Old Man House, features artifacts excavated by the University of Washington archaeologist Warren Snyder, in 1950 and 1951.  The collection returned last October to the Suquamish Tribe from the Burke Museum where it had been on deposit since the excavations. Large format photographs and graphics illustrate the archaeological excavations and information gleaned from the subsequent research about the site.

 

Suquamish Tribal Chairman, Leonard Forsman, and Suquamish Tribal Historic Preservation Officer, Dennis Lewarch, assisted Ms. Sigo with the research for the exhibit.  Also on view, in the Lawerence Webster Education Auditorium, is a film by local producer, Matthew St. Carrell, who worked with Ms. Sigo to produce an accompanying video presentation: Ancestors Return: The Legacy of Old Man House.

 

The site, occupied for thousands of years by the Suquamish People, is best known today for Old Man House, a traditional Salish design shed roof dwelling.  Once home to Chiefs Sealth and Kitsap, both hereditary leaders of the Suquamish Tribe, the dwelling is believed to date from the later part of the Eighteenth-century, reaching its peak by the mid Nineteenth-century during the lifetime of Chief Sealth.

 

Today the site on the shore of Agate Pass is a housing subdivision with a portion of the traditional Old Man House beach preserved within the boudaries of the Suquamish Old Man House Park.  The structure itself was burned in the 1870s by the U.S. government to encourage Suquamish Tribal members who still lived on the site to remove to individual allotments assigned to families on the Port Madison Indian Reservation.   The Park site, purchased by the State of Washington in 1950 to perserve a portion of the original Old Man House Village Site, was returned to the Suquamish Tribe by the Washington State Parks and Recreation department in 2004.

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

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